The African Ancestral Presence in Early New York

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By admin February 21, 2014 13:37 Updated

Remembering the City’s First Work Force

08_10Standing Guard: Masons escort casket through canyons of Wall Street at 2003 African Burial Ground re-interment ceremonies: Historian Christopher Moore said in The New York Observer last month: “People often want to imagine slaves as this separate, disconnected category, but those slaves were working folks. They were essentially colony builders.” Moore, chief researcher for the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, wrote and produced the History Channel’s award-winning television special, The African Burial Ground: An American Discovery. He told Our Time Press that since the discovery in 1991 of The African Burial Ground at Broadway and Reade in New York City, there have been other burial sites uncovered containing the remains of free and enslaved Africans of the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, in Harlem, Queens, Manhattan’s Bowery area and other sites. The African Burial Ground, adjacent to City Hall and designated a Landmark in 1993, is one of the largest in North America, with an estimated  20,000 buried  in the six-block area. (Photo credit: Barry L. Mason)

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By admin February 21, 2014 13:37 Updated
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